Savoy Cabbage Gratin with Delice de Bourgogne. Meltingly tender ruffly savoy cabbage in a rich puddle of tangy cheese enriched broth. Almost hard to believe it's really cabbage. From Blossom to Stem | Because Delicious www.blossomtostem.net

Savoy Cabbage Gratin

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If one wants evidence that cooking is an alchemical process, one need look no further than this rich, savory puddle of a gratin that once was a head of savoy cabbage.

Savoy Cabbage Gratin with Delice de Bourgogne. Meltingly tender ruffly savoy cabbage in a rich puddle of tangy cheese enriched broth. Almost hard to believe it's really cabbage. From Blossom to Stem | Because Delicious www.blossomtostem.net

Savoy is the frilly, ruffled member of the cabbage family. Its leaves are more tender than green or red cabbage, and its flavor is milder and more delicate.

This savoy cabbage gratin comes from Molly Stevens’s wonderful book All About Braising. If you’re looking for simple warm comforting winter meals, this book is a great source for them. This recipe, in particular, is a standout.

Savoy Cabbage Gratin with Delice de Bourgogne. Meltingly tender ruffly savoy cabbage in a rich puddle of tangy cheese enriched broth. Almost hard to believe it's really cabbage. From Blossom to Stem | Because Delicious www.blossomtostem.netSavoy Cabbage Gratin with Delice de Bourgogne. Meltingly tender ruffly savoy cabbage in a rich puddle of tangy cheese enriched broth. Almost hard to believe it's really cabbage. From Blossom to Stem | Because Delicious www.blossomtostem.net

It has only five ingredients: savoy cabbage, scallions, stock (chicken or vegetable), butter, and a nice creamy French cheese like Saint Marcellin, Saint Andre, or Delice de Bourgogne. And it only takes about 15 minutes of active work. The oven does the rest. And what emerges is a meltingly tender, rich, savory gratin that tastes so delicious, that, as Dan said, “it’s hard to believe it’s cabbage.”

It doesn’t look like much, but the brothy puddle at the bottom of the pan is so good you’ll want to sop it up with crusty bread. It’s as warming and comforting to me as a pan of macaroni and cheese, but it’s mostly vegetables.

Savoy Cabbage Gratin with Delice de Bourgogne. Meltingly tender ruffly savoy cabbage in a rich puddle of tangy cheese enriched broth. Almost hard to believe it's really cabbage. From Blossom to Stem | Because Delicious www.blossomtostem.netSavoy Cabbage Gratin with Delice de Bourgogne. Meltingly tender ruffly savoy cabbage in a rich puddle of tangy cheese enriched broth. Almost hard to believe it's really cabbage. From Blossom to Stem | Because Delicious www.blossomtostem.net

This is, I think, the sort of dish that could make cabbage skeptics reconsider. It’s the kind of dish I want all winter long.

Savoy Cabbage Gratin with Delice de Bourgogne. Meltingly tender ruffly savoy cabbage in a rich puddle of tangy cheese enriched broth. Almost hard to believe it's really cabbage. From Blossom to Stem | Because Delicious www.blossomtostem.net

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Savoy Cabbage Gratin with Delice de Bourgogne

Yield: 2 -3 servings as a main dish, 4-6 as a side
Source: Adapted from Molly Stevens’s All About Braising
This dish takes a simple head of savoy cabbage and transforms it into something tender and rich and savory and delicious. I wouldn’t substitute green or red cabbage here, savoy is more delicate both in texture and flavor than the other two. I have made this with both chicken and vegetable stock and it’s excellent either way. It’s vegetarian if you make it with vegetable stock; it’s a bit richer with chicken stock. For the cheese, Stevens uses Saint Marcellin, which comes in little individual rounds. I’ve made this with the much easier to find (and cheaper) Saint Andre, and one of my favorite soft cheeses Delice de Bourgogne and it’s been wonderful both ways. Don’t be intimidated by the fancy French cheese names. What you want is a soft, triple cream style of cheese, like Brie or Camembert but with more complex flavor. There are plenty of options out there, but I know that what’s available at any given grocery store varies widely. I think the most widely available cheese in this style is Saint Andre, which I have seen at Trader Joe’s and at our local Jewel. We usually eat this as a light main dish, but it would also be lovely as a vegetable side. As a main, it’s nice with a hunk of crusty bread.

Ingredients

  • 1 inch medium head of savoy cabbage cored, quartered, and sliced into 1/2- strips
  • 1 inch bunch scallions both white and green parts, trimmed and cut into 1/2- pieces
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 3/4 cups chicken or vegetable stock
  • 3 ounces Delice de Bourgogne Saint Marcellin, Saint Andre or any flavorful triple cream style cheese, rind removed and torn or sliced into 1/2-inch chunks

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F. In a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat, add the butter, scallions, and cabbage and a generous pinch of salt. The cabbage will cook down quite a bit–if it doesn’t all fit at first, let some of it cook down and add the rest when there is room. Saute, stirring frequently, until the cabbage is tender and beginning to brown in spots, about 10-12 minutes. Add the stock, bring to a boil, and cook for an additional 2 minutes or so. Remove from the heat, cover with a tight fitting lid or aluminum foil, and transfer to the oven.
  2. Cook for 45 minutes. Remove the cover, and cook for an additional 20 minutes or until most of the liquid has evaporated. Turn the oven up to 375°F, scatter the cheese over the top of the cabbage, and cook, uncovered, until the cheese is melted, about 10 minutes.
  3. Serve warm, in bowls, as a side or main.

 


25 Comments

  • Hi there! I’m not much of a cook, but this looks delicious! I have a couple questions–since I never buy unsalted butter, why that, instead of salted butter. Then, since I really can’t be trusted with butter in the house!! 🙂 — Is the butter just for flavor? How would olive oil substitute? Thanks!

    Reply
    • Teresa, the unsalted butter is just so you can control the salt levels in the finished dish. The amount of salt in salted butters isn’t consistent, and stock tends to have a significant amount of sodium, so the unsalted butter helps to balance that. That being said, the amount of butter is small and you could definitely use salted butter here and have a good result. You could use olive oil, but I think the flavor profile of this dish works better with butter (either salted or unsalted).

      Reply
  • Can you use regular cabbage?

    Reply
    • Patricia, I wouldn’t use regular green or red cabbage here–they have significantly thicker, tougher leaves than savoy. If you have trouble finding savoy cabbage (which I realize can be hit or miss at grocery stores) then I’d opt for napa cabbage (the oblong Asian cabbage), which is more tender and delicate. Still, I think savoy is the best cabbage to use here if you have the option.

      Reply
  • Always looking for new cabbage recipies. Have try this one.

    Reply
    • This is one of my all-time favorites. I hope you like it!

      Reply
  • I love cabbage. Who loves cabbage, right?! Ummm ME. This looks absolutely divine!!

    Reply
    • Thanks, Chrissa! If you already love cabbage, you really love this one.

      Reply
  • I’m not typically a huge fan of cabbage, but this looks good and I’ll certainly give it a try! Maybe it will be just the thing to change my mind 🙂

    Reply
    • Natalie, I think this is different from any other cabbage dish I’ve had. I think this could really be a good one for someone who’s lukewarm on cabbage.

      Reply
  • We love cabbage and are definitely going to try this recipe! Sounds amazing! Thank you! If you are open to it – give my BBQ cabbage recipe a try – on my site http://www.thehungryfamily.com It’s always a big hit!

    Reply
    • Thanks, Natasha! And thanks for the recipe suggestion. I’ll check it out.

      Reply
  • I, too, am not much of a cook, but this looks amazingly good. I’m going to pass it onto my daughter to try! Thanks so much for sharing!! 🙂

    Reply
    • Thanks, Tania! I hope she likes it!

      Reply
  • I love cabbage, but I was getting tired of making my own recipe for such a long time. I will try this one next time. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
    • It can be nice to get out of a rut and try something different once in awhile, can’t it?

      Reply
  • this looks delicious! i never thought of this dish, so creative!

    http://www.footnotesandfinds.com

    Reply
    • Thanks! It’s one of my favorites.

      Reply
  • That’s an interesting way to eat cabbage. I’m always looking for new ways to cook cabbage other than stir-fry.

    Reply
    • Christine, I think this really brings out a different side of cabbage. I love it over high heat in a stir fry, but letting it cook slowly in a braise like this really turns it into something soft and perfect for cooler weather.

      Reply
  • Just made this with Brie because I’m too lazy to go to a Trader Joe’s. I was very skeptical because my past foray with cabbage was a disaster, but even though I couldn’t cook this at the correct temperature because of my high-heat roasting chicken with which it shared an oven, it was absolutely divine!!! Can’t wait to make it again at the correct temperature. I’m expecting an even silkier cabbage. The Brie was good in this dish. Perhaps I should have cut it more thinly to spread it across the dish but instead I just stirred it around after it was all done and it was delicious.

    Reply
    • I’m so glad you liked it! This is definitely one of those things that’s so much more than the sum of its parts.

      Reply
  • This looks so delicious! Warm, comforting…..simply succulent. Making this dish this weekend to pair with a baked ham. Can’t wait.

    Reply
    • Thanks, Marilyn! Let me know how it turns out.

      Reply
  • […] about much of the seasonal produce when the pickings are slim. Oh, I like root vegetables and cabbage and squash but sometimes I need a break from all of […]

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